In need of an update

I have a number of new writings and videos I need to showcase. Also, I’m working on some changes here on the site. But mostly, I just need to freshen the place up. It’s kind of important I do this stuff sooner rather than later because I’m going to be going on vacation in July. Getting me to sit in front of a computer then will be impossible. So, to summarize, an update is coming soon. Cheers.

Credit confusion

Just to clarify, in case you haven’t seen my Tweets or public Facebook posts, I did not shoot any footage of the Boston Marathon finish line. That was my colleague Steve Silva. While Silva was out in the field working, I was in the office and posted his video to Boston.com. Because I posted the video, there was an impression that I took the video. That is not the case. I was in the office the entire time.

Thanks for checking in

Thanks to all that called or messaged today after the Marathon bombing. I was tucked away safely at the Globe, far away from any danger. But I do appreciate your thoughts and concerns, particularly because the Boston Marathon is an event that I work on each year. My head is still swirling from the events of the day. Sadly, it will be a more memorable day than any one of us had imagined. My thoughts are with my colleagues who were at the finish line when the explosions occurred. And my heart bleeds for all the victims. There’s not much else to do now but pray.

How much value do you put in journalism?

How much is this rag tag industry I love worth to you? How much do you value the daily proposition at hand?

Today, now more than ever, we’re at a cross roads. No, I’m not writing about our country; I’m writing about the media. To be specific, I mean the uninfluenced, open dialogue platform that is the medium which you are consuming right now — journalism. Specifically newspapers. The analysis of the slow death of this industry is endless, and really ruthless in a lot of respects. On one end, we’re watching as newspaper companies are bleeding from their self-inflicted wounds (McClatchey or Tribune) and on the other we’re watching under-capitalization put the dagger right in the back of broken communities (MediaNews). In the middle, the economy has tanked so far as much to put a strain on many a consumer, businesses and etc., for even the most solid papers to scream uncle. But in the end, we continue to circle the wagons right back to where we started. How much is knowledge worth to you?

Can you quantify how often it is that you depend upon what journalists provide? What a sports journalist provides? Do you know exactly what I do for a living? (Think cave-man like: I both hunt and gather news.) Look, the fat cat days of the ’80s are over. We know that. We are no longer working on a surplus budget in which we can throw money at coverage or people. Furthermore, industrial and philosophical change has divided the best of newsrooms.

Anyone with an ‘old days’ story will tell you that.

But the value of news, the information, the dialogue and the watchdog role is still paramount — at least in my belief. Who is going to follow the standards, set by editors long before me, to verify your sources thrice over? Who’s going to be fair?

I hope to explore that here. That and more.