The Herald on my new show: Get ‘The Rundown’ on Boston Herald Radio

Editor’s note: This article appeared in the July 17, 2017 Boston Herald.

Boston Herald Radio debuts today its new afternoon program, “The Rundown,” with Herald Deputy Managing Editor for News and Multimedia Zuri Berry.

With updates directly from the Herald city desk and reporters in the field, “The Rundown” will capture the essence of the Herald news report as it develops over the course of the day.

“We’re going to bring in newsmakers and experts to help explain the news and the reporters who are closest to the top stories every day,” Berry said. “Expect insight and analysis throughout.”

The show, which will stream 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. every weekday, will also incorporate the Herald’s award-winning sports staff for regular updates on the Red Sox, Patriots, Celtics, Bruins and more.

“This is going to be a great way to get up to speed, learn something and get ready for the game,” Berry said.

Listen to “The Rundown” on bostonherald.com, in the Boston Herald news app or on the TuneIn and iHeartRadio apps. Follow Boston Herald Radio on Twitter @HeraldRadio or on Facebook at facebook.com/bostonheraldradio.

— HERALD STAFF

New Facebook page

Editor’s note: I wrote this Facebook note to introduce my new Facebook page, facebook.com/zuriberryBHR, and my new radio show on Boston Herald Radio, “The Rundown.” You can listen to The Rundown 2 to 4 p.m. weekdays on Boston Herald Radio.

There is no easy way for me to start so let me introduce myself and lay out the purpose of this page, which I hope will give you and I a reason to build at least a small connection of some sort.

My name is Zuri Berry and I am the deputy managing editor for news and multimedia at the Boston Herald. I am also the host of “The Rundown” on Boston Herald Radio. Those are my titles, but I am so much more.

I grew up in San Francisco and went to public schools. My first job was at an urban farm outside of the Alemany Projects. I played baseball, basketball and football in school. I went to a community college and ventured up to Northern California for my bachelor’s at Chico State. I spent four and a half years in rural California getting my journalism degree and working at a local newspaper as a sports writer and online community manager.

I came to Boston almost 10 years ago to be a digital sports reporter because that’s all I had ever wanted to be. I figured I’d spend a few years here covering the Patriots and then somehow make my way back to San Francisco to cover the 49ers. It was a simple plan.

But then I found my wife here in Boston and now I’m a father with a second child on the way. Somewhere along the way, I got an itch to get back into the news part of the industry. I had covered sports for 10 years before I quit to work on the news side in California. I’ve also been a video producer and I’ve worked in TV as a digital editor. Now I’ve been an editor at the Herald for two years.

I’ve had all of these tremendous experiences that have shaped how I view the news, how important I see fairness is to the process and how pivotal transparency is to news gathering. Maybe it’s my sports background, where everybody has access to the box score and TV, but I am of the belief that people should know how journalists do their work and that the hallmark of good analysis — not punditry — is that it is of sound logic based on history, facts, data and accessible knowledge. If everyone knows how I came to a conclusion, how can they chide my reporting or denounce my analysis as fake? But more than that, I am of the belief that the media should always work to champion people over organizations and hold those who want to wield power over others accountable for their actions.

I have seen over time a concerted effort to conduct the people’s business behind closed doors, spin away corruption and ineptitude, a loss of civility in public discourse and a newfound effort to revitalize propaganda. I am against it — all of it. But I wage this journalistic battle armed with nothing but these values, a healthy dose of skepticism and the perspective of informed individuals to help me along the way. That includes you.

Now I have this new opportunity to analyze the news on Boston Herald Radio. It’s not something I ever expected I would be doing, hosting a radio show, and it’s not something I sought out. But it’s something I am prepared to do and I want smart people on my side pointing me in the right direction, helping me combat the wrongs they see in the media, and keeping me on a path that embodies the values I’ve laid out above.

I’m going to try to be as as informative as possible here. Whether it’s about the news in Massachusetts or elsewhere, my only goal is that this page is helpful to you as you wade your way through your busy day and that you know where I’m coming from when you get a link from me or hear an interview I conduct.

As an editor, I like to think that I want to cover the issues that matter to my readers and listeners the most. But I have particular fondness for exploring issues related to inequality, health care, education, and technology. If you have any ideas of issues you think I should cover on the show or in the Herald, you can leave a comment below or message me on this page.

You can always expect me to be open, honest and accessible.

Thanks for reading this and hopefully I will be much more brief in the future.

Boston Globe wins Pulitzer prize for breaking news

Boston Globe editor Brian McGrory salutes his staff for their work during the Boston Marathon, noting that it was such a trying period.
Boston Globe editor Brian McGrory salutes his staff for their work during the Boston Marathon, noting that it was such a trying period.
The Boston Globe won the Pulitzer prize yesterday for breaking news coverage of the Boston Marathon. While I’m glad to have played a part in the coverage, I’m so sorry I had to.

We’re now at the one-year anniversary of the tragic bombings that took place. It’s a good time to reflect on what an honor like this means and to keep it in perspective. So many people spent countless hours reporting, editing, and updating the public on every single piece of information that came across our paths. And over time, as the accolades have piled up, the awards continue to be a somber reminder of what has taken place, both for those who were intimately involved in the coverage of the tragedy and those who were only on the periphery. Three people were killed — Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell, Lingzi Lu and later Sean Collier — while more than 260 others were injured.

That somberness, despite any hint of joy or pride in the recognition bestowed, remains. It won’t leave us. And if there were a better way to win an award, I would take it. I can only speak for myself in that sense. But that sentiment was shared widely yesterday in the newsroom after the awards were announced.

“There’s nobody in this room that wanted to cover this story. And each and every one of us hopes that nothing like it ever happens again on our watch,” Globe editor Brian McGrory said.

How we covered the Marathon in the very beginning

Boston.com was truly a pivotal part of the Marathon coverage for the Globe and was a prominent portion of the Globe’s entry to the administers of the Pulitzer prizes at Columbia University. As the leading web portal in New England, we were first with the news online and we truly were a 24-hour news operation going forward. In those immediate hours, I was manning the desk with then Boston.com sports editor Matt Pepin. We were putting together projects and photo galleries from the day’s race and were getting ready to wind down from the cranked up nature of the Marathon. That changed when the first tweets and photos came from the finish line. Matt and I culled those tweets together together before one of our producers, Steve Silva, sent his first dispatch.

What many people don’t remember about the Globe’s coverage is that those first tweets and photos were posted in Boston.com’s live race blog before we transitioned to the actual live coverage of the bombings. We ran both live blogs for a period of time because there were so many of our online readers — a substantial amount actually — who were on our site for the race coverage. Those numbers only increased dramatically in our race blog before we switched over completely. Maintaining both was seen as the right thing to do for our readers until it was no longer feasible.

This is where the quick thinking of Adrienne Lavidor-Berman, the Globe’s social media editor, came into such great use. She was able to deftly handle the transition and set us up for success. Matt and I handled the race blog (the sports guys) and Adrienne handled the bombings blog. We made sure to cross post until we finally made the split.

Also worth remembering was that both Boston.com and BostonGlobe.com, because of heavy internet traffic, were down for a period of time. During that period, the Globe actually had our live blogs hosted by ScribbleLive’s servers, which enabled us to keep publishing live and keep our readers informed. ScribbleLive describes this in full here.

You can only imagine all of the technical, emotional, and logistical difficulties that arose during that time. In that sense, it was remarkable we were still able to produce the content we did. So I think it’s important to note that while the reporting on the ground was pivotal, there should be quite a bit of recognition to our developers and web staff for being able to traverse such a difficult set of circumstances.

Again, I’m really proud of what we were able to accomplish, but I’m really sorry that such a tragedy is what caused it. And as what was noted yesterday by the Globe’s sports editor, Joe Sullivan, when a stressful, adverse, and unwelcome situation arises, you never know how you’re going to react. The staff of the Boston Globe and Boston.com reacted by doing its job. I think the Pulitzer just recognizes that.

Globe sports columnist Bob Ryan says goodbye after 44 years – Sports – The Boston Globe

“Day One did not begin well. En route to the Globe for my first day as a summer intern, I was sideswiped on Storrow Drive by a Bloodmobile.”

via Globe sports columnist Bob Ryan says goodbye after 44 years – Sports – The Boston Globe.

One of my favorite moments hanging with Bob Ryan was back in Vancouver in 2011 when the Boston Bruins were battling with the Canucks for the Stanley Cup. Bob and I so happened to pull the short straw — or maybe it was the long one — and were asked to stay in Vancouver during Game 6, which was being played in Boston, to save the Globe money and so we could have staff in place if and when the teams would return to the west coast for Game 7. (It was something we anticipated and were ultimately right about.) Those were long flights, and if you’ve covered any team in pro sports, you know that beating the home team to its next destination is nearly impossible. During the Stanley Cup, the Bruins and Canucks had gotten used to holding press conferences after touching down and making their way to the rink.

Anyways, Bob and I had the awesome task of waiting out Game 6, while also enjoying Vancouver. Now Bob is more of a lone wolf, so I didn’t see him out much. But at night, when the NBA Finals were playing concurrently, I caught him at the hotel bar for some pick-me-ups and some basketball talk. It was during those conversations that I got his impression of the NBA lockout, a topic I had dismissed as easily as I had the NFL lockout. And to be fair to myself, the issues in the NBA were still below the radar nationally. But not for Bob. He knew then, ahead of all the hoopla, that the NBA and its players association were far apart. He told me he wasn’t sure the NBA was going to have a season.

After a lengthy lockout, followed by a 66-game season, I realized that he’s not only pretty good at recapping some of the finest moments in sports history, but he’s also pretty good at predicting outcomes as well. If only he were a betting man. Maybe he can take that up in semi-retirement.

One last story.

One of the first assignments I worked on for Boston.com and the Globe was at a Celtics game with Bob in the building. At the time, I wasn’t well versed with the protocol at TD Garden, the seating arrangements, etc. After the pregame locker room access, I made my way to the press seats, which are tucked away in a corner of the Garden. The section has a sort of hierarchy to them, with the front four seats dedicated to the Boston Herald and the Boston Globe. The Globe typically has three to five seats at games, with the other seats much higher than the two up front. Because I was (and continue to be an early bird), I took one of the first two seats because they weren’t assigned by name.

Little did I know.

First to come by was Frank Dell’Apa, a Globe veteran, who is by most accounts, unnerved by anything. It was our first meeting. We introduced ourselves, he sat down next to me, and we started to get ready for the game. Next to come by was Bob, who looked over, waved, and continued up the section to the next available seat. And lastly, Julian Benbow, our Globe colleague and the Celtics beat writer at the time, came by on his day off to observe and stopped to talk to me.

“What are you doing,” Julian asked.

“What do you mean,” I replied.

Julian went on to educate me how I was sitting in the wrong seat. In particular, I was sitting in Bob Ryan’s seat. The front two seats he told me were meant for the Globe’s beat writer, Dell’Apa for the day, and the columnist on duty. Feeling a little embarrassed, I said nothing. But as the game got going, and I hadn’t yet moved, Julian decided to come down from the higher seats and talk to me again.

“Do you know people are sitting around and talking about why Bob Ryan is sitting up here and you’re down there?” he queried.

This wasn’t going well. So after the first quarter — a meaningless game against the Utah Jazz — I walked up to Bob, who was sitting next to Julian about six rows above, and told him I had no idea what the deal was with the seating (a weak apology, I admit) and asked him if he wanted to switch spots.

Bob wasn’t worried about it. In fact, Bob just brushed it off.

I remember thinking later that night how cool he was about the situation. Seating can be, and has been known to be, quite a contentious discussion in the press box. Just ask anyone sitting in the back row at Fenway Park. But that moment sort of crystalized what kind of person Bob was. Despite his celebrity — which he doesn’t like to admit to — he is as down to Earth as any other eccentric in this business, and one that doesn’t have the least bit of diva to him.

He’s a good guy and and I’ll miss the opportunity to have any more drinks with him on the road. As everyone who has ever known him will tell you, his stories are great and his memory is phenomenal. That combination, unfortunately for the Globe, is irreplaceable.

Lucky for the Globe, he is still going to write 30-40 times a year on Sundays.

Good news

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I came back to some good news, I guess. Our editors returned with two awards for Boston.com sports at APSE. It’s always good to be recognized.

Schilling: State of RI broke financial promises as governor scared away investors | Breaking News | providencejournal.com | The Providence Journal

Schilling: State of RI broke financial promises as governor scared away investors | Breaking News | providencejournal.com | The Providence Journal.

You sort of knew this was coming, that Curt Schilling would lash out at somebody — anybody. But still, it boggles the mind that he could double down in the midst of this failed enterprise. It doesn’t bode well for his loan repayment plan.

A big congrats to Greg Lee

Greg Lee Jr., the senior assistant sports editor for the Boston Globe and a dear friend of mine, was elected as the President of the National Association of Black Journalists.

At 37, Greg is the youngest NABJ member voted to be president. With 294 votes, he bested his nearest competitor by a wide margin (the runner-up tallied 168 votes) in a three-way race.

As I’ve said before here in this space, I support Greg not just because he’s a friend but because of the hard work he puts into this industry and his constant advocacy for journalists of color. With a solid head on his shoulders and a knack for financial prudence, it was clear to see why the organization’s members overwhelmingly supported him as well with their votes.

So, again, good luck Greg. There’s a lot of work to do.